From “Demand-Generation” to “Revenue-Generation”: How to “Become a Revenue-Driven” Marketer |by: Glenn Gow |Marketing Profs

In this article, you’ll learn…

  • How leading marketers are turning their organizations into revenue engines
  • Best-practices for transitioning Marketing into a revenue-focused organization

The days of being grudgingly accepted as a necessary #CostCenter, are numbered for #Marketing…Today, the writing is on the wall: Either demonstrate how Marketing will contribute to the company’s top-line revenue growth… or be prepared to change careers…!!

#CMOs and VPs of Marketing need to step up and take responsibility for #RevenueProduction…That means coming to the table with a #RevenueMarketing Forecast and aligning tightly with #Sales, to ensure the revenue goal is met…

Some companies are even assigning Revenue Quotas to Marketing and compensating marketing executives on meeting those quotas…Your company might be next…!!

As a #Marketer, you can view this trend as a negative, or you can approach it as an opportunity to finally achieve credibility within your company, especially with the #ExecutiveSuite…Showing a return on investment is the entrée to a strategic place at the executive table…

The big question is How to make the transition from being a Demand Generation-focused Organization to becoming a Revenue-Generating Organization…??

There is no cookie-cutter solution, but there are proven best-practices being used by savvy marketers to successfully drive revenue-focused marketing (also see the infographic at the end of this article)…

FIVE Best-Practices for Becoming a Revenue Marketer :

1. Start at the Top to create a Revenue-generation #MarketingPlan – The first step in the revenue marketing process is to look at your company’s overall business plan, including the revenue goal. Your marketing plan should align with the business priorities and goals for your company as set out in the company plan.

You then determine the percentage of the overall revenue goal that marketing should contribute. Though the percentage will vary by industry, in our experience it’s not uncommon to see targets starting at 30% or even higher. Based on that target, you can set performance goals for the demand waterfall, including the number of visitors, leads, opportunities, and closed deals you need to make your revenue quota..

2. Get your measurements in place – Many marketing departments don’t know how to focus on revenue as a goal because they don’t understand how they can measure it. You must have the proper systems in place so that you’re able to track a lead from the moment it comes in all the way through the buying cycle, when that buyer purchases, renews, or cancels.

A connected view of the buyer lifecycle allows you to demonstrate marketing’s contribution to revenue..

The problem is that many marketers have disjointed systems or they lack the right marketing solutions altogether, which limits their ability to track performance across the buying cycle…A VentureBeat study found that only 20% of large companies use marketing automation today..#MarketingTechnology, will be imperative to connect the dots across the buyer’s journey and Measure Key-performance-indicators, that support Revenue Generation…!!

3. Speak the same language as Sales – Becoming a revenue-generating marketing organization means working much more closely with Sales than in the past. And to get their attention, you need to speak their language. When you talk about open rates, lead generation, and automated nurture campaigns, Sales hears “marketing-speak.” Don’t talk about leads. Talk about qualified opportunities and closed business..

As marketing organizations make the transition into revenue generation, the shift to speaking the same language will start happening organically. Planning, forecasting, pipeline, bookings, and revenue become the common ground for the two organizations to work together..

4. Maintain the Relationship with Prospects and Buyers – It’s no longer acceptable to hand off the lead or opportunity and walk way. Marketing has to take responsibility for working with Sales to find ways to help move the buying process along. When Marketing hands off the opportunity, it shouldn’t lose the relationship. It needs to maintain the connection throughout the buyer’s journey.

Once a lead is qualified and converted into an opportunity, Marketing should create pipeline acceleration programs to help Sales close deals…For instance, marketing could create an individualized program for opportunities that have been stuck for 30 days or more, to help move them forward..

5. Define Service-Level Agreements – Part of committing to a partnership is agreeing on how you’ll work together…#SLA (Service-level agreements), can help you better define your working relationship with Sales. For example, you might decide that Marketing will provide only leads that meet certain criteria as an opportunity, then once that opportunity is handed to sales, Sales must make contact within 48 hours, else the opportunity reverts to Inside Sales..

The point is to agree on when an opportunity will be handed off, how long Sales will hold it, and what happens when the required action does not occur. The agreement needs to be ratified at the most senior levels within Sales and Marketing to ensure buy-in and commitment from the top down…

It’s All About Revenue Now :

Nearly every marketing executive is feeling the pressure to show a financial return. But signing up for a revenue number should be viewed as a positive: It’s an opportunity to expand Marketing’s influence and justify a larger budget..

As you build your Revenue-Engine, you can scale your Success, Grow Marketing’s contribution to the #BottomLine, and make that Seat at the Executive-Table permanent…!!

 

“Indian Consumption Pie”: “Food to stay No.1” item on Family-shopping List | by: Abheek Singhi | Livemint

“Food will remain the Largest Spend Category” even in 2020 with spending of Rs.40 trillion, followed very closely by “Housing & Consumer Durable” with spending of Rs.35 trillion..!!

Most Indians, even those with incomes of $3,000 (around Rs.1.8 lakh) per-annum OR Lower, consume basic products such as cooking oil, bathing soap, washing powder, and tea. But, as they get richer, they start to purchase durable goods, with the typical hierarchy being TV and cooking gas as the top focus..

Ten years ago, Rakesh Sahu, who runs a small restaurant on the outskirts of Lucknow, ate cheap rice, avoiding fruits because of the cost involved. Now, he buys branded refined oil, basmati rice, and eats all the fruits and vegetables he wants because he can afford the extra spending…

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“I don’t think twice before buying good food for my family today”, says Sahu, whose income has increased more than five times in the past 10 years from Rs.90,000 per year to Rs.5 lakh now…!!

He used to get clothes stitched for the family for special occasions earlier. These days, he buys ready-made garments —though he does not spend extra for brand names..

The amount Sahu spends on consumer goods and what he chooses to spend his money on fit into a pattern that has accompanied rising incomes in India. The aggregate consumer expenditure is likely to increase from Rs.45 trillion in 2010 to nearly Rs.150 trillion by 2020—an over-threefold jump in a decade..

Sahu, for instance, does care about brands in the durables space. His television set is an LG, which he bought after watching a programme on a neighbour’s LG. He has moved his son from a government school to the City Montessori School—an English-medium private school. “I want my son to have the best education possible”.

Where once he had no money for “Leisure or Entertainment” (discretionary spending), Sahu now takes his wife out for an occasional movie and even the spot of jewellery shopping…

We analysed consumer spending across different categories and how it is expected to change with rises in income levels and over time. Today, the No.1 item on the family shopping list is food, accounting for nearly one-third of the total consumer spending. Second on consumers’ spending list is housing and household appliances, closely followed by transport and communication..

Interestingly, the spending across different income segments is quite different and has changed with time…!!

To monitor this transition, we use a tool we call consumption curves. This helps us establish how consumers change their spending habits as they earn more. Different types of products have differently shaped curves—and this demonstrates that consumer demand for different products and categories changes at varying rates..

For items such as #Household goods, the consumption curve is an upward line, indicating a steady rise in spending as incomes rise. Other #ConsumerCategories, that rise steadily, if less steeply than Household Goods, are Transport and Communication, as well as #Education..

Expenditure on “Health”, another Major Category, only really starts to rise as people enter the upper-middle OR affluent classes, with only the tail-end of the Consumption curve bending upwards. By contrast, the #ConsumptionCurve, for Food..follows a gentler trajectory, and “actually flattens out as people get richer”… You can only spend so much and consume only so many calories…!!

Exhibit 1: shows the consumption curves for broad categories across different countries for the three different types of curves for Household-goods, #Health-care and Food. We find that the consumer off-take pattern changes with increase in income—even within the same broad category.

Exhibit 2: show the three patterns observed in India. The first type of increase is “inflection point”—observed in the mass #FMCG (fast moving consumer goods),categories such as Tooth-paste—which also have low-cost substitutes such as Tooth-powder..

In this situation, category consumption changes dramatically as the consumer enters the middle class and then remains largely flat…!!

The second pattern is “continuous growth”, which holds true for most durable goods and more premium FMCGs. Here, the consumption increases steadily with increases in income. The third pattern is “stable with income”, observed in highly penetrated FMCG categories such as biscuits and vanaspati..

In this case, the level of penetration is not significantly different across income segments…

Our research indicates that as people enter the #Middle-class, they switch their focus to Consumer-goods that enhance their quality of life Far-beyond subsistence..

Most Indians, even those with incomes of $3,000 (around Rs.1.8 lakh) per annum OR lower, consume basic products such as cooking oil, bathing soap, washing powder, and tea. But, as they get richer, they start to purchase durable goods, with the typical hierarchy being TV and cooking gas as the top focus..

Beyond this, they prioritize goods and services relating to the family, especially children…

We have calculated that 37% of the middle class household’s expenditure is devoted to children, mainly their food and education…One young couple we met in Mumbai, earning about Rs.15,000 per month and living in a one-room chawl, spends nearly Rs.1,000 per month on the school fees for their only daughter. “We want the very best we can afford for her,” they explained…!!

We have estimated how the shape of consumption is likely to change for India in the future, based on the consumption curves from 2010 to 2020…Food will remain the largest spend category even in 2020 with spending of Rs.40 trillion, followed very closely by housing and consumer durable with spending of Rs.35 trillion.

The fastest growing categories are related to “Education, Entertainment & Leisure”, increasing more than FOUR Times in the 10-year period…!!

It seems clear that Both the Size & Shape of Consumption is going to undergo dramatic changes going forward…!!