“Modern Grocery Retail” & the Emerging-market consumer : A complicated courtship | McKinsey

In some “Emerging Markets”, the response to “Modern Grocery” formats has been tepid. What’s a Modern-Grocer to do ??

20 years ago, Modern Grocery Retail appeared poised to conquer every consumer market in the world. Ambitious European grocers, having blanketed their home countries with Supermarkets and Hypermarkets, began setting their sights on growth both within and beyond the continent. They held particularly high hopes for China, India, and other emerging markets, where fast-rising consumer spending seemed to presage an unprecedented demand for gleaming new stores with large assortments, wide aisles, and bright lighting.

In the 1990s, the term “modern grocery retail” was essentially a proxy for a small group of multinational grocers including Ahold, Aldi, Auchan, Carrefour, Costco, Lidl, Metro, Tesco, and Walmart…It was widely presumed that these retailers’ entry into any market would lead to the demise of the traditional trade—the family-owned grocery chains, small independent stores, and informal merchants that at the time accounted for the vast majority of grocery sales in emerging markets. The prevailing expectation was that although there would be local differences due to cultural specificities, in every country the retail landscape would eventually consist of a combination of modern formats: full-line supermarkets and hypermarkets, convenience stores, and discounters..

These assumptions have been proved wrong. Global grocery giants are struggling to grow profitably in many emerging markets… whereas, Traditional trade has proved remarkably resilient…And the market and channel structures taking shape in individual emerging economies are distinct from one another, following no obvious pattern.

Why did this happen? What, if anything, did multinational grocers do wrong? And what does it mean for the future of modern retail in emerging markets?

The Hypermarket’s shortcomings:

To understand the disparity between early expectations and the current reality, it’s useful to examine the roots of the two quintessential modern-trade formats: the supermarket and the hypermarket. The hypermarket in particular—whether in its European form (in which food anchors a massive selection of nonfood items) or its North American one (the “supercenter,” which represents the successful injection of food and grocery into a general-merchandise discount store)—was widely regarded as unbeatable. By offering tens of thousands of products in an immense building just outside or on the edge of a town or city, a hypermarket could operate at a level of productivity that other grocery formats struggled to match. Hypermarket operators passed on these efficiency gains to consumers in the form of lower prices, which served to reinforce hypermarkets’ advantage.

In their first forays into other developed markets abroad, major retailers relied heavily on the hypermarket format. When French retailers Auchan, Carrefour, and Promodès opened hypermarkets in Spain during the first years of Spanish economic reform, they quickly captured a large fraction of that country’s overall grocery sales and dictated the market structure that remains in place to this day.

Expansion across Europe was an exciting growth prospect, but even more enticing to retail leaders and investors was the growth potential of emerging markets. Over the years, that potential has become even clearer: by 2025, we expect emerging markets to account for $30 trillion in consumer spending, or nearly half of global consumption.

When multinational grocers entered emerging markets, they again relied on the grocery formats that were working so well in the developed world. But, in retrospect, it’s clear that the countries in which the hypermarket prospered had several characteristics in common: good road networks and high or fast-rising car-ownership rates, a large middle class that enjoyed decent wages and stable employment, and a high proportion of rural and suburban households with enough room at home to store groceries bought in bulk. Also, those markets had grown to maturity at a time when many women didn’t return to work after having children and therefore had time during the day to drive to and from the store. The hypermarket format draws heavily on consumers’ time, ability to travel, and storage capacity…

In Emerging Markets, retailers encountered an entirely different context. Consumers were less affluent and lived in urban areas; many didn’t own a car, couldn’t afford to travel to and from a relatively far shopping destination, had no room at home to store purchases, or all of the above..

A new respect for localism:

Further complicating matters, emerging markets weren’t just different from developed markets; emerging markets also differed from one another in nontrivial ways. That was true in the 1990s and it remains true today. Based on our research—which involved in-depth study of the retail sector in ten developing countries in Asia, Eastern Europe, and Latin America, as well as interviews with more than 20 local retail and consumer experts and analysis of channel-growth data in these markets—we’ve developed a perspective on the factors that have hampered the growth of modern trade in emerging markets.

On both the demand side (what customers want from retailers) and the supply side (the means by which retailers can deliver what customers want), different factors shape the retail ecosystem in each country. Together, these factors produce wide variability in the level of modern-trade development in countries around the world (Exhibit 1).

On the demand side, for instance, food-shopping habits have turned out to be largely localized and deeply entrenched. Emerging-market consumers tend to prepare their own meals and cook more than their peers in developed markets do, and they are accustomed to shopping at open-air market stands or small neighborhood grocery stores that offer a familiar selection of fresh food and household staples. They don’t necessarily perceive customer service at modern retailers as superior to that of the traditional trade. Customers of India’s kirana stores—small, family-owned retail shops in or near residential areas—already benefit from personal service from the store owner, free home delivery, and credit and cash rebates if they remain loyal..

On the supply side, a big factor is the informality of traditional trade: many small retail businesses rely on unpaid labor from family and friends, pay no rent because they own their storefronts, and don’t pay corporate taxes. Modern retailers cite this informality as a major challenge when competing with local retailers. A European hypermarket chain found that its considerable operating-cost advantage from better sourcing and supply-chain processes was canceled out by the fact that it was paying taxes while local competitors were not..

Another major factor affecting modern trade is public policy. India’s restrictions on foreign direct investment have limited the growth of modern retail there; in China, by contrast, city governments are assessed on the level of economic activity and foreign investment they attract, which makes them biased toward supporting modern trade. As a result, modern-trade penetration in China’s largest cities has grown significantly over the past 15 years..

A further supply-side factor in emerging markets is the fragmented supplier base, which places a natural limit on the benefits of scale. A retailer can’t source products as efficiently as it would in a mature market because it must buy from a complex network of regional and local entities. And even retailers with a national buying team won’t easily find national manufacturers who are eager to partner with them—a point we pick up on later.

Incumbent advantage is yet another powerful factor shaping retail ecosystems. Today’s market dynamics tend to become tomorrow’s market structure—so, for example, in markets in which a highly efficient wholesale system serves the traditional trade, it becomes much harder for modern grocers to gain a foothold. That said, wholesalers can also be vanguards of modernization. In Turkey, for instance, some Bizim Toptan stores have developed a substantial retail business. These wholesalers-cum-retailers illustrate the fact that ecosystems in emerging markets are partly shaped by players that can concentrate and coordinate a critical mass of what otherwise is a complex set of routes to market..

“Seven” strategic levers for success:

In parts of the world where the market structure is itself still in a formative stage, retailers need a bespoke strategy. Our research and experience suggest seven strategic levers that lead to success in emerging markets. These levers—having to do with delivering what consumers want, working effectively with other players in the ecosystem, and generating lasting productivity advantages—reflect perennial concerns for retailers everywhere, but they are especially critical in helping retailers secure a profitable future in the world’s fastest-growing economies.

The levers are by no means comprehensive. For one, they don’t touch on digital technology, which may well be just as important in emerging markets as in developed ones; indeed, rapid adoption of smartphone technology may allow emerging markets to leapfrog more mature markets and reconfigure the value chain farther upstream (for example, by giving smaller suppliers direct access to national and even global markets). Rather, we draw attention to areas that we believe require deliberate action in emerging markets-

1. Prioritize proximity.

2. Keep prices low—and make sure consumers know.

3. Obsess over productivity.

4. Make the business case to manufacturers.

5. Educate policy makers on the benefits of modern trade.

6. Consider partnering with the traditional trade.

7. Adopt a city-based strategy.

For any modern retailer, success in emerging markets isn’t guaranteed. Our research confirms the complexity and local specificity of market development and the degree to which it depends on initiatives taken not just by retailers but also by governments, manufacturers, wholesalers, and others in the local retail ecosystem. International retailers thus need to become experts at local tailoring. That said, operating in emerging markets still unquestionably requires excellence in core retailing competencies: marketing, merchandising, supply-chain management, and talent development, to name just a few…

Modern Retailers that excel in all these areas in the context of markedly different emerging-market structures will, in a sense, have conquered the world..!!

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Making Brick & Mortar Stores ” matter in a multi-channel world ” | McKinsey

As the role of the brick-and-mortar store evolves, retailers will continually have to refine how they use their real estate…!!

For decades, the retail industry has followed the same straight forward formula for growth: open new stores. By replicating a proven store format in a new catchment area, retailers could reliably enlarge their customer base and count on healthy increases in sales.

But the world has changed. More than half of consumers now research their retail purchases online, making purely in-store purchase decisions the shrinking minority. In many categories, e-commerce has dramatically lessened the need for physical stores. “Virtual space”—which we define as the floor space that would be required to generate the sales volume that online retail now accounts for, at a sales density equivalent to the industry average—is expanding at a staggering rate. In this new world, what is the role of the brick-and-mortar store?

Many retailers find themselves struggling with the question and saddled with more real estate than they know what to do with. After all, their property departments are geared up for expansion and acquisition. Their finance departments have traditionally focused on reaping investment returns from stores and tend to be jittery about investing in new and unproven technologies. On the flip side, their e-commerce directors are frustrated by this lack of understanding of the pace and mind-set such companies need to become digital winners.

To position themselves for success in a multi-channel world, retailers would do well to take a disciplined approach that begins with a reassessment of the role of the physical store. We recommend a FIVE-step approach we call STORE : starting with a clear vision for the future role of the store, tailoring categories and formats accordingly, optimizing the store portfolio using forward-looking analytics, reinventing the in-store shopping experience, and executing systematically across channels…

The incredible shrinking footprint: 

The effects of online migration in the retail industry are evident in every category. In the United States, apparel retailer Gap closed more than 250 stores in 2013; department-store chain Sears closed almost 200. Walmart’s new stores are about a third smaller than they were five years ago…!!

Online retail has affected more than just physical floor space. Amazon, for one, has put intense pressure on retailers’ top and bottom lines by having key items priced 13 to 20 percent lower than average, an assortment 17 times larger than the average retailer’s, and a cost base that is 3 to 4 percent lower than brick-and-mortar competitors’, all while achieving the highest customer-satisfaction scores in the industry. The combined effects of Amazon and other online retailers have rapidly hurt traditional retailers’ return on invested capital, as fewer sales flow through existing physical assets.

Many retailers’ instinctive response to these headwinds has been to close under-performing stores and to look for operational efficiencies, but these moves only buy time—they can’t fully close the performance gap…“Shrinking to greatness” is not the answer.

A framework for change: 

Shifting from a store-focused approach to a multi-channel mind-set requires retailers to change their traditional frames of reference and ways of working. As consumers increasingly shop across channels, terms like “convenience” and “efficiency” take on new meanings. Customer expectations are rising: for instance, customers now expect price consistency across channels, the ability to buy online and pick up or return in store, and a range of payment options. Price transparency puts pressure on retailers to develop ultra-efficient operating models. The wealth of online information available to consumers raises the bar for in-store service and expertise.

But let’s be clear: the brick-and-mortar store is not dead; it just plays a different role now. In fact, in a multi-channel world, physical stores can provide a competitive advantage… Some multi-channel retailers have seen growth in their online sales and penetration among consumers who live near their stores. In several sectors, “click and collect” is proving a popular and increasingly efficient means of serving the customer. More than 50 percent of Walmart’s online sales and around 40 percent of Best Buy’s already are picked up in stores. Best Buy’s store-within-a-store partnerships with Microsoft, Samsung, and other suppliers capitalize on manufacturers’ need to show off their products in a physical retail environment. Former online pure plays such as Oak Furniture Land and sofa.com have opened physical stores that now generate as much as 60 percent of sales.

Some retailers are now reshaping their store networks in response. One approach is to lead with a handful of flagship stores—which essentially become a marketing and service channel for the online business—supported by numerous smaller outlets that offer convenience and a curated product offering.

In light of rapidly evolving technology and consumer behavior, we believe retailers that take a forward-looking view and heed the following five imperatives can position themselves for multi-channel success.

Start by Redefining the role of the store:

The first question that retailers should ask themselves at the beginning of their store-network transformation journey is, “What role will my brick-and-mortar stores play in a multichannel world?” To answer the question, retailers must find out what their customers truly care about. They need to know which aspects of a store matter most to customers and what purpose a store serves for them:

  • Convenience and proximity.
  • Efficiency
  • Inspiration
  • Instant gratification.
  • Discovery of a solution, information, or service.
  • Entertainment and social interaction.
  • Experiencing brands and products.

 

Economic considerations are important as well. For each of the purposes above, retailers should ask, “How can stores do this profitably?” There may be more than one answer and therefore more than one winning store format. In any case, the agreed-upon role (or roles) of the store should dictate every decision about the store operating model: location, assortment, staffing, supplier funding, employee training, and so on.

Tailor categories and formats accordingly:

Customer priorities and store economics should next become critical inputs into ongoing category reviews, to ensure that assortments and space allocations are continually optimized for a multichannel world.

Format decisions should also be driven by customer needs and priorities. Some retailers are adapting their store formats to the tastes and preferences of certain customer segments. Macy’s, for example, has embarked on a major effort to court millennials: it has launched more than a dozen segment-specific brands and created “destination zones” for millennials in its stores.

Optimize the portfolio using forward-looking analytics:

The next step is to re-evaluate the store portfolio through a multichannel lens. Leading retailers regularly analyze correlations between sales performance and catchment data to identify promising locations for new stores and to figure out the winning formula for top-performing stores; they examine factors such as population density, income, competitor presence, and average tenure of the sales staff. This is a valuable exercise, but in a fast-changing business environment, it’s not enough. Retailers must look ahead: they must extrapolate the impact of macro and industry-wide trends on the store network’s economics and operating model. And they must understand the impact that channels have on one another. One retailer that already had 100 unprofitable stores in its network found that another 100 would be in the red within three years given competitor trends and the shift to e-commerce.

The most forward-thinking retailers use analytical tools and techniques to reshape their entire store networks. They use financial and geospatial modeling to highlight not only where stores should be opened but also which should be closed, resized, or reformatted.

Re-invent the in-store shopping experience:

Creating the store of the future will mean overhauling the in-store customer journey, in part by using new technology to make the shopping experience as seamless and easy as possible. Some retailers simply copy the in-store moves of multichannel champions such as Apple and Burberry or equip sales staff with iPads to give their stores an updated, high-tech look. But cosmetic changes alone won’t result in lasting impact. A multichannel mind-set must be embedded in the store design and in employees’ new ways of working.

Retailers should prioritize the basics: again, focusing on what matters most to their customers and enabling multichannel shopping (for instance, by establishing fast-pickup counters for online orders) while being ruthless about taking costs out of the things that customers don’t care about.

Execute systematically across channels:

Change of this scale is not easy and affects many functions across the organization. Some retailers make the mistake of developing a store-network transformation plan that extends past 2020, by which time parts of the plan will probably be obsolete, or else they embark on a massive change program that will take so long to roll out that it will be out of date before it is halfway done. Retailers are typically better served by developing a detailed plan for the next 12 months and a high-level road map for the next three years.

Pace and flexibility are critical. “Gold plating” an entire store takes too long and tends to be expensive. Retailers should instead test new ideas quickly, and they should pilot individual aspects of store design to figure out specifically what is working and what isn’t.

Of course, capabilities and organizational design, both at headquarters and in individual stores, must evolve as the network evolves. Retailers should ask themselves: Does the organizational structure support the new network size and role? What would it take to shift the mind-sets of the property team away from a focus on opening new stores and toward making better use of existing space, introducing and refreshing store concepts quickly, and even scaling back on real estate? the store of the future should allow shoppers to move seamlessly across channels…Store staff should be well trained and comfortable in directing customers to the right products, both offline and online.

The logistics and store teams should work hand in glove with the online team to ensure that orders are fulfilled efficiently and to get products to consumers quickly….!!

How “Indian QSRs are going social ? ” | by: Nusra | Restaurant India

Indian Quick Service Restaurant (QSR) segment has seen many New Brands making inroads into the market…Indian QSR market has remained largely unaffected by the economic slowdown and touched nearly around $50 billion from Rs $35 billion in 2013. The segment is growing at a very fast pace…!!

Brands on demand:

Indian fast food majors like Cafe Coffee Day, Yo! China, Haldiram’s, Nirulas, Sagar Ratna and Bikanervala have met all the global necessities to meet the demands of the local customers, who are becoming an adaptor of global QSR outlets. Not only this, the regional QSR chains like Shiv Sagar, Bangs and Ammi’s Biryani created a milestone in competing to their foreign counterparts, but have also adapted their strategies on how to target the over growing demands of their customers..

Meanwhile, we have seen that, global players have tweaked their menu keeping in mind the taste and preferences of Indian customers. We have seen that major global QSR chains, which are entering India, have to localise their offerings before establishing themselves here..

Indian chains have now realised that people here are rushing towards convenience and value that these QSR chains offer and there is a wide gap in the market in terms of authentic Indian Cuisine being served in a quick service format and thus, they ventured into Indian QSR segment to address the local customers with its Innovative concept.

“The Usp of Hello Curry is ‘Indian Food with western quick service efficiency’, many of the QSRs present nationwide today are catering a niche with western products. Hello Curry will be unique with its positioning as the first QSR with complete range of Indian cuisine,” says P Sandeep, Co-Founder, Hello Curry..

Placing it Right :

Quick service is one of the challenges Indian QSR players are facing with Indian food, as the main preparation itself takes 15 to 20 minutes for preparing a dish. The restaurants have to innovate on processes and technology to develop ways to serve a customer flat in 2 minutes across the counter or 30 minutes in case of a home delivery.

After years of learning from global players, Indian QSRs are now quick to adapt to social media. They are now trying their hands at cracking the social recipe to success by posting new recipes on Facebook and Twitter or promoting it through Instagram and they are becoming quite close to cracking the code of the social marketing strategy which entered India via global route.

“As we are all young entrepreneurs, we are from the tech world of today. Hence, social media is one of the biggest assets of marketing. We are available on Facebook, Instagram, Zomato and we are connecting our consumers through WhatsApp. We are also doing PR and media activities, but I am not in the mainline PR advertising because I believe that word-of mouth is the best tool for advertising, where food works as a marketing tool itself,” says Sachet Shah, Go Panda (one of the partner).

While many international chains have set its footprint across the country, the Indian home grown chains have fought bravely to catch up with them. Cafe Coffe Day, Yo! China and Haldiram’s have set the traditional scene in India and are also leveraging social media by rightly placing themselves in the social gathering.

“There are many reasons for the success of our restaurant. But the major reason is that we operate in the Chinese food segment, which is the most desired cuisine among youth as they are the main consumers today. When we talk about eating out trend, I think we are operating in a segment which is massively catering to the youth. We create fun at our restaurant, we are value for money restaurant, our restaurants are trendy, we offer innovation and are present at the right location. The strategies help us gain an edge over others. We are here for 11 years building brand because brand brings consistency and the ability to stay requires time,” shares Ashish, MD & Co-Founder, Yo! China.

Thus, we can say that the growing trend in the QSR segment is becoming more of a social engagement rather than restaurants coming up with new products and keeping it to their specific target group…!! 

The “Four Pillars” of “Blue Ocean Leadership” | INSEAD

To unleash employees’ untapped talent and energy, leaders need a strong repertoire of actions, not just better awareness and empathy…!!

Most leadership programmes are generally designed to hone the cognitive and behavioural skills of leaders with the implicit assumption that this would ultimately translate into high performance. Leaders are accordingly called on to develop traits like self-awareness, self-regulation, and empathy, for example, all of which require deep self-reflection and introspection to assimilate into a person’s being.

While cultivating such values are important, when we asked people to look back on these programmes, most reported not seeing a marked change in leadership caliber..

As one executive put it, “Without years of dedicated efforts, how can you transform a person’s character or behavioural traits? And can you really measure and assess if leaders are embracing and internalising these personal traits and styles? In theory yes, but in reality it’s hard at best.” In the end, millions of dollars were often spent, excitement was initially generated, but real leadership change did not set in..

Pillar One: Focus on acts and activities.

Blue ocean leadership, in contrast, is action-based, just as strategy is. It focuses on what acts and activities leaders need to do to provide a leap in motivation and business results driven by people, not on who they need to be. It’s the difference between being asked to be motivating versus being asked to provide those you lead with real-time feedback and best practice lessons that internally motivate and guide those you lead to up their game while feeling valued. The summation of these acts and activities is the leadership equivalent of a company’s strategic profile only here the aim is the development of a compelling leadership profile grounded in actions that are easy to observe, measure, and are directly linked to performance. This difference in emphasis has an important consequence for the time and resources needed to bring about a change for high performance. It is markedly easier to change a person’s acts and activities, than their values, qualities, or behaviours.

Of course, changing a leader’s activities is not a complete solution, and having the right values, behaviours, and qualities is important. But changing acts and activities is something that any individual can do, given the right feedback and guidance..

Pillar Two: Connect leadership to market realities by engaging people who confront them.

We observed that the leadership approaches employed by organisations are often generic and detached from what firms stand for in the eyes of customers and the market results employees are expected to achieve. At one insurance company, for example, call center personnel were tasked with fulfilling customer claims rapidly, while their frontline leaders maintained a hands-off approach to getting the claims department to cut checks rapidly.  Call center personnel rightly felt set up to fail, hugely demotivated, and let down by their leaders.

Blue ocean leadership, in contrast, focuses on what makes effective leaders, not in a vacuum but in light of the market realities their organisations confront and their direct reports must deliver on. Blue ocean leadership does not subscribe to a generic approach of common leadership acts and activities much as strategy does not subscribe to the same strategic profile across organisations. Instead people who face market realities are asked for their direct input regarding what acts and activities their leaders do that hold them back and what they need from their leaders but aren’t currently receiving to be their best and effectively serve customers and key stakeholders. When people are asked to help define the leadership acts and activities that will make them thrive and are connected to the market realities against which they need to perform, people get the type of leadership they and their organisation need and are highly motivated to share their energy and perform to the best of their abilities. As one employee put it, “I am under constant pressure to produce market results. I need the decisions and actions of my boss to support me to succeed in achieving market results. Currently there is a disconnect here.”

Pillar Three: Distribute leadership across different management levels.

While the market realities that organisations face today demand that there should be leaders at every level, the majority of leadership programmes we observed still remained largely focused on the top. But the key to a successful organisation is having empowered leaders at every level. It’s an illusion to expect or rely on top management on its own to deliver high performance especially as outstanding service all too often comes down to the motivation and actions of frontline leaders who are often in closest contact with the market. Executives need to push responsibility down in the organisation so that people on the frontline can deliver world-class service. Organisations need to develop effective leaders deep in their organisation by distributing leadership across different management levels, but that was often not the case.

Blue ocean leadership addresses this need by focusing on distributed leadership, not top leadership. By distributed leadership we refer to leadership distributed at the senior, middle, and frontline levels. Blue ocean leadership sees leadership as needed at all three levels to unlock the ocean of unemployed talent and energy that stretches deep into organisations. It also understands that these three levels are different enough from one another. Each requires a different leadership profile to be effective since each has a different positional power, task environment as well as focus on and interaction with the external environment. The factors that define good leadership are derived by the acts and activities leaders need to take at each level to create a leap in value for both employees and customers. In this way, blue ocean leadership, like blue ocean strategy, is about creating a nonzero-sum, win-win outcome. As we’ve heard repeatedly, “Almost everyone leads someone, not just the top. But when it comes to leadership, we focus on the top. The truth is 90% of our people don’t even have contact with them so how is their greatness supposed to transform our organisation? We need effective leaders at every level.”

Pillar Four: Pursue high impact leadership acts and activities at low cost.

Leadership practices are all too often seen and treated as something added on to people’s regular work. But with secretaries and administrative staff in most organisations already cut back to the bare minimum and the market reality intense, most leaders’ plates are already full. Finding the time to do one’s regular job is tough enough, let alone attempting to up one’s game. So a step-change in leadership strength rarely occurs. Time is just not enough.

Blue ocean leadership recognises this. It breaks the trade-off between impact and cost by focusing as much on what acts and activities leaders need to eliminate and reduce in what they do as on what they need to raise and create to unlock the ocean of unemployed talent and energy to drive high performance. In the context of leadership, high impact refers to achieving high motivation and engagement of people to drive business results while low cost refers to a lower investment of time by leaders, which is their most expensive and limited resource.

Our research has found that many of the acts and activities that take up leaders’ time actually work against them being effective and can even be resented by those below them, not appreciated by those above them, and are an energy sapper for the leaders themselves. By expressly eliminating and reducing these acts and activities, leaders’ time is freed to focus on new acts and activities that make a real impact on leading and producing business results driven by people. Without freeing up leaders’ time in this way, it is often no more than wishful thinking that leaders will have the time to up their game..

Conventional Leadership Development Appoaches Blue Ocean Leadership
Focus on the values, qualities and behavioural styles that make for good leadership under the assumption that these ultimately translate into high performance. Focus on what acts and activities leaders need to undertake to boost their teams’ motivation and business results, not on who leaders need to be.
Tend to be quite generic and are often detached from what organizations stand for in the eyes of their customers and the market results their people are expected to achieve. Connect leaders actions closely to market realities by having the people who face market realities define what leadership practices hold them back and what leadership actions would enable them to thrive and best serve customers and other key stakeholders.
Focus mostly on the executive and senior levels of organizations. Distribute leadership across all three management levels because outstanding organizational performance often comes down to the motivation and actions of middle and frontline leaders who are in closer contact with the market.
Invest extra time for leadership practices added on to people’s regular work. Pursue high impact leadership acts and activities at low cost by focusing as much on what leaders need to eliminate and reduce in what they do as on what they need to raise and create.

To put blue ocean leadership in action, we adapt the analytic tools and frameworks of blue ocean strategy to the leadership context. The result is the Leadership Canvas, the Leadership Profile and the Blue Ocean Leadership Grid all of which are grounded in acts and activities, easy to understand and communicate and that engage more people in an organization…The tools and methodology point is very important…

Without that it is very hard for research to do more than inform but practically address the challenges of leadership development for high performance…!!

“Global Luxury Brands” : Why India matters ? | by: Sapna Agarwal | Livemint

A look at the issues related to the potential of the ” Indian Luxury Market “, estimated to be worth $14 billion a year..!! 

A large and growing middle class in India is not only buying luxury goods and services but, inevitably in an Emerging Market the size of India, is also redefining the luxury market..

There’s an image of India—one that has persisted despite being a cliche—that is contoured by contrasts: Maharajas on the one hand, in full regalia and motorcades of Rolls Royce limousines, and poverty and hunger on the other. As India of the 21st century aspires to rank among global manufacturers and service providers, the luxury that once defined the Maharajas is a matter of widening aspiration, too..

The national airline—whose mascot was the Maharaja—no longer carries just the privileged few to the Swiss Alps and other luxury holiday destinations. A large and growing middle class in India is not only buying luxury goods and services but, inevitably in an emerging market the size of India, is also redefining the luxury market. But while India tops the list of tomorrow’s markets, it is yet to make it to the top in the priority markets list of luxury marketers..

What will it take for luxury marketers to tap into India? And what will it take for India to realize its luxury potential to the maximum? Experts and marketers gathered at a two-day Mint Luxury Conference in Mumbai on 31 October and 1 November to discuss some of these issues and challenges. Firstly, the definition of the Indian luxury consumer needs to change—start with banishing that cliched image of the Maharaja. “Luxury cannot be limited to just the very top or 0.01% of the population,” says Abheek Singhi, senior partner and director, Asia-Pacific leader-consumer and retail practice at consulting firm The Boston Consulting Group.

He estimates the Indian luxury market to be worth $14 billion. But for a country with a population of 1.2 billion, there are just 117,000 people who are classed as ultra-rich—people who have family wealth of over Rs.25 crore or earn Rs.3-4 crore a year, says a July report by Kotak Wealth Management. This segment of consumers prefers to do their luxury shopping abroad. In the local context, luxury denotes brands that globally are a notch lower than the finest, appealing to a wider audience of the top 1%, 5% or even 15% who have the aspirations and the money to buy them, said Singhi..

To grow the luxury market, “marketers selling in India need to be innovative and reach out to new consumers”, says Sanjay Kapoor, managing director of Genesis Colors Pvt. Ltd, parent of Genesis Luxury Fashion Pvt. Ltd whose portfolio includes brands such as Bottega Veneta, Burberry and Canali. According to Kapoor, luxury marketers need to continually “upgrade” consumers used to buying premium to luxury goods and services. “It’s a continuous process of educating people about brands to grow the existing business,” says Kapoor. Adding new brands and opening new stores is the business part of the same process..

There are FIVE Luxury Consumer Segments emerging in India, says Singhi : Classpirationals, who want to blend in with the classes; Fashionistas, or Trendsetters; Experiencers who love travelling, wine tasting, etc.; Absolute Luxurers for whom luxury is about exclusivity and customization; and Megacitiers—part of the global elite..

As such, the Indian luxury consumer is spread across the metros, tier-I and tier-II cities. “Close to 40% of the Indian luxury consumers are living outside of metros and shop on their travel overseas or in the metros,” says Singhi..

Firms seeking to expand in India speak of infrastructure challenges. For instance, India got it’s first luxury mall—DLF Emporio—in south Delhi in 2007. Now, there are just two more luxury malls in the country. “The biggest impediment to the development of the luxury market is the lack of infrastructure and an environment,” says Rahul Prasad, managing director (Asia-Pacific and Middle East), Pike Preston Partners Ltd, a boutique advisory firm on mergers and acquisitions in the fashion and luxury segments..

Meanwhile, with the new National Democratic Alliance (NDA) government in India, businesses are hopeful regulatory hurdles will be resolved. “The new government’s approach has energized a number of companies, including multi-brand retailers and international retailers..,” says Pierre Mallevays, founder and managing partner of Savigny Partners LLP, a corporate finance advisory firm focusing on the retail and luxury goods industry..

At the Mint Luxury summit, Nirmala Sitharaman, commerce and industry minister, agreed to look into the requirement of 30% sourcing from domestic companies for single-brand foreign retailers who are allowed to invest 100%..

The challenges remain daunting. According to Armando Branchini, vice-chairman of the Altagamma foundation, a conglomerate of several high-end Italian companies, there are 17 Italian luxury brands in India at the moment, a number that has remained unchanged since 2005..

British luxury brands are focusing their efforts in other markets such as China, says Charlotte Keesing, director at Walpole British Luxury, a consortium of British luxury retailers like Jimmy Choo, Harrods and Burberry. Eight years ago, India and China both were on the long-term radar of luxury product marketers..

Today, China has become one of the biggest growth drivers of such products, and India is yet to take off…“ There are only 18 of 90 British luxury retailers present in India today and less than a dozen are looking at entering the market in the next two years,” said Keesing…

“South India’s Real-Estate Hotspots” for Investments | by: Juggy Marwaha | Realty Plus

Until only recently, the South Indian Real-Estate Market was known as highly price-sensitive, with buyers primarily focused on the Affordability quotient…!!

Developers had to adopt a strategy to entice potential end-users and investors by offering their products in the right price band. However, with more and more foreign companies establishing their back offices in prime locations of South Indian cities and offering power jobs to the local populations, the South Indian economy has witnessed rapid growth over the last few years. This has visibly reflected on their real estate markets, as well..

Of late, the most important South Indian real estate markets – Bangalore, Chennai, Hyderabad and Kochi, have been faring very well. This dynamic was evident even when the nation was going through a phase of low sentiments. While the burgeoning IT sector in these cities is the main reason behind the real estate boom in these cities, some of them also have a rapidly strengthening industrial base which is further augmenting real estate demand..

Bangalore :

The commercial office leasing trends in Bangalore clearly reflect that the city is topping all others in terms of space and job creation. IT, ITeS and retail are driving employment creation in the city. Bangalore is expanding in all directions, and with most phases of the Metro on track in terms of deployment, Bangalore has emerged as one of the best investment destinations for affordable, affordable luxury and luxury segment housing.

North Bangalore has seen residential prices doubling in the last 4-6 years, and many other pockets have witnessed good appreciation as well. Brigade Gateway, one of the best integrated townships in Bangalore featuring the World Trade Centre, a mall and a 5 Star hotel, was launched at a price of Rs.5,000/sq. ft. about 4-5 years back and is now transacting at above Rs. 10,000/ sq.ft.

There are numerous such examples wherein reputed developers and landmark developments have been instrumental in prices doubling and going even higher in the last 4-6 years. The finest developments in Whitefield by Sobha, Brigade, Prestige, Total Environment and Chaitanaya have practically doubled in terms of capital values in the last 5 years.

Chennai:

Residential property prices in Chennai have escalated the fastest among the cities in India, witnessing an appreciation of almost three times of what they were in 2007. However, Chennai still faces supply constraints in its prime locations in terms of new and organised development..

Traditionally, buyers in Chennai were hesitant to move to the suburbs, as the options available in the key pockets were highly priced. Very similar to the cities like South Mumbai, Delhi and Kolkata, buyers in Chennai are very particular about address and pin code value. As the city is in expansion mode with the rapid development in Chennai’s social and physical infrastructure, the suburbs and extended suburbs such as Velacherry, Peringudi and OMR belt are witnessing an upsurge in its property prices with corresponding demand.

Areas like Ayanavaram, Virugambakkam, Nungambakkam and Ashok Nagar have recorded the maximum appreciation. With limited supply and few organized developers in Annanagar and Kilpauk, end-users and investors are finding prices attractive in these neighbouring areas. With noted developers such as Chaitanaya, Vijayshanti and Arihant-Unitech active in these areas, there is a steady increase in demand.

The Central business district of Chennai, Nungambakkam, has managed to maintain the highest appreciation values with only few organized developers active in the area. However, with the Metro rail route passing through Ashok Nagar and with host of reputed and local developers’ active along the belt, a considerable amount of demand has shifted to this micro-market.

This is because of the presence of large commercial and entertainment-shopping establishments such as Phoenix and Forum and the availability of adequate social and physical infrastructure such as quality educational institutions and hospitals have proven beneficial in garnering demand from end-users and investors.

The three key growth drivers of IT / ITES, automobile manufacturing and education sector are instrumental in driving the job creation in Chennai. The price appreciation in specific pockets forecasts to be extremely good over the next 12-18 months. Some of the projects which are garnering attention from end-users and investors are Falling Waters in Peringudi, Oceanique on ECR Road, Embassy Residency and Pristine Acres in OMR.

Hyderabad:

Taking in consideration the current prevailing prices, developers have very little room for profit. Properties here are value buys in all respects, and one cannot go wrong with buying into quality projects at the current price levels with an investment horizon of 3-5 year. The Telangana agitation was the primary reason for the stagnation of prices in Hyderabad.

While Hyderabad’s average prices may reflect stagnation, there are multiple exemptions to this rule. A few such instances are Jayabheri’s Orange County, which has seen 33% absolute appreciation within a horizon span of 3-4 years and Jayabheri’s Silicon County, which has almost doubled in the last four years. Aparna’s Sarovar Grande has seen about 43% absolute appreciations in the last 12-15 months.

Good projects by reputed developers have shown very robust capital appreciation in the city. Though Bangalore and Chennai has clocked better appreciation values, Hyderabad by no means has lacked appreciation growth – it has merely been selective.

The socio-political and economic scenario is now far more favourable for the real estate sector. Hyderabad’s real estate market is likely to grow at a relatively faster pace to give renewed competition to cities like Bangalore, Chennai and Kochi. In the mid-to-long term, investor confidence in Hyderabad real estate will emerge in force once more. Companies like Facebook, Google and Apple have long-standing plans to expand their bases in Hyderabad – a factor which will work in favour of faster appreciation.

One of the hottest emerging locations is Vijaywada, where land prices have increased by almost 300% because of speculation. This renders Vijaywada unviable for residential projects over the short term, but a price correction from the speculative levels in anticipated over the next one-and-a-half years. After that, many more corporates will move into Vijaywada, thereby boosting residential demand as well.

Kochi:

Kochi is an emerging metropolis where modern urban lifestyles are merging with the city’s traditional framework. During its initial realty boom, Kochi grew exponentially, with more people migrating to the city and consuming even the outlying catchments of Kakkanad, Palarivattom, Vytilla, Edappally and Kadavanthra.

Development of IT/ITES projects such as the Kochi Smart City and initiatives to channelize traffic and improve connectivity – such as the Mobility Hub at Vytilla – have fuelled the current real estate boom, with more and more developers cashing in.

The days when builders in Kochi focused only on affluent buyers are over. The Kochi residential real estate market is now replete with affordable housing projects, which account for about 60% of the total housing development in the city. The soaring land prices have made it difficult to own or build independent houses, which were once the most popular configuration in Kochi. There is an increased demand from the emerging mid-income segment that wants homes packed with amenities at affordable prices.

The demand for budget housing is so strong that supply has penetrated even the poshest areas. The prime localities that offer luxury multi-storey apartments, such as Marine Drive, are seeing the arrival of affordable and mid-income housing projects in the vicinity to the more expensive waterfront apartments and villas.

While the global recession in 2009-’10 impacted all markets across the country, there was no decrease in Kochi residential real estate between 2012-13. Kochi is an investor market with many investments coming in from the Gulf via NRIs. In most cases, flats in new projects are sold out to the tune of 80% very quickly, but less than 20% would be actually occupied.

Luxury apartments on Marine Drive were quoted at Rs. 3800-4000/sq.ft in 2008-’09. Now, the rates for premium apartments in this area have almost doubled. Mid-range apartments by local developers are usually sold out by upto 90% of the inventory over a period of 1.5-2 years. The apartments in non-prime areas need to sell at price tags of upto Rs. 70 lakh….!!

“FIVE Revolutions”, That Will “Shape the Future of Your Company” | Chief Executive

Everyone knows change is coming….But underestimating the speed and impact of these changes will be the downfall of many businesses large and small in the coming years…!!

The press is full of trendy terms—Big Data, the Internet of Things, Digital Natives, Globalization, Social Media, etc.—that attempt to describe the complex technological and social changes that the world is currently experiencing. However, there is a danger in reducing complex social dynamics down to a few catchy buzzwords—trendy terms can act as intellectual shortcuts that fool people into thinking they understand these ideas when they really don’t..

In a world of constant disruption and uncertainty, however, CEOs who truly understand the key forces behind these changes will be in a better position to adapt and survive…Looking ahead, there are several horizon-level revolutions that business leaders should be aware of, because they are about to be felt with a force that is difficult to overstate..

Revolution #1: The End of the Information Age:

Many people think we are still in the Information Age, but the truth is that we are leaving the Information Age behind and entering a new stage of human development fueled by global inter-connectedness and rapidly improving technologies of all kinds. The exponential growth and convergence of so many new technologies—combined with a growing population of tech- and media-savvy consumers—will usher in a revolutionary era of social change, the likes of which humanity has never seen before. In the future, companies will need to find ways to protect themselves from the inevitable disruptions that such changes will bring, while simultaneously recognizing the advantages and opportunities..

Revolution #2: The Shift From Institutional to Individual:

One of the biggest power shifts of the 20th century was the shift from institutional power to individual power, and that isn’t going to stop. The Internet empowered individuals to communicate with anyone in the world, and now populations armed with nothing but cell phones are bringing down entire governments. Furthermore, institutions in all areas of life—education, health care, religion, media, business—are being forced to change simply because people now have more ability than ever to organize, mobilize, innovate, disrupt and demand..

Brands, too, have gone from being purely institutional inventions to personal expressions of almost any kind. For businesses, continuing empowerment of individual customers means that the dynamics of the business/customer relationship are evolving. Customers will continue to demand more transparency, integrity and responsiveness from those they choose to do business with—and businesses will have little choice but to comply. Smart businesses will initiate the inevitable rather than wait to be pushed..

Revolution #3: Artificial Intelligence Becomes Less Artificial:

Creativity and imagination are often thought of as the one realm that computers can never conquer, because the inner workings of the mind are what make humans unique. But it is already possible to control a computer with our thoughts alone, and commercials for IBM’s Watson computer are now touting its ability to generate ideas—helping chefs develop original recipes, for instance—using data to spark creative inspiration.

As artificial intelligence continues to evolve and improve—powered by the combination of Big Data, the Internet of Things, and always-connected devices tied to people’s location and activities (e.g., the Apple Watch)—it will begin to behave more and more like a giant alternative brain, one that rivals and surpasses humans in many ways. Machines already do most jobs that involve repetitive motion. When machines start replacing people who use their imagination for a living—writers, designers, architects, engineers, teachers, etc.—they won’t just be taking better jobs, they’ll be challenging what it means to be human.

This shift will create a great deal of psychological stress, generating a massive need for goods and services that will help them adjust to this strange new reality. Brands that can help people ride the wave of change to a brighter future, or help people cope and adapt, will be in high demand—as will brands that affirm human values and identity..

Revolution #4: Rise of the Digital Natives:

Much has been written about the impact of millennials (those born between 1981 and 1997) on the workforce, but the next wave of workers and consumers entering the workforce will be the digital natives (those born after 1997). Digital Natives are the first generation in human history to be born into the world of hyper-connected information overload…However, since they’ve been connected since birth, digital natives do not experience the flood of information hurling at them as anything more than just “the way things are,” and always have been—for them..

At the moment, millennials are assuming positions of power in all walks of life, and their impact on everything from viral memes, infotainment, social media, spheres of influence and cross-platform content has been profound. But when digital natives start adding their ideas and influence into the mix, the pace of change will accelerate even faster. This acceleration will feel to older generations like constant chaos and disruption, but to digital natives, it will simply be business as usual..

Revolution #5: From Selling to Sharing:

Since millennials and digital natives have been aggressively marketed to their entire lives, they are also extremely savvy about the media they consume. Direct, blatant pitches don’t work on them. They hate being sold to, and to them, commercials are just the things you fast-forward through to get back to the program. Also, since they are wary of institutions, they are much more likely to trust the opinion of a friend than anyone else, hence the rise of social media as a powerful marketing tool.

In the future, selling is going to be less about persuasion and more about participation…Brands that position themselves as a trusted “friend” have a much better chance of succeeding in this environment…

That’s not a new idea; the key is truly being worthy of the customer’s trust. For example, Whole Foods knows that its customers care about the ecological, political, and social impact of the food they consume…To help make that information more readily available to its customers, the company is investing in IT infrastructure to support its vision of total product transparency—a move it hopes will inspire the sort of trust and loyalty all companies are looking for in the 21st century…!!